Archive for the ‘India’ Category

Sanitation initiative for Indian slums

July 21, 2014  |   General news,India,Projects,Sanitation   |

Sanitation initiative for Indian slums

We have developed a brilliantly simple solution to help mitigate the horrendous problems caused by a lack of sanitation in India’s slum areas. Using our unique waste management system, the content from the toilets is routinely collected by our own operatives and taken back to our central processing plant where it’s quickly composted down for agricultural use. The primary purpose of the project is, of course, to reduce disease and poverty but in addition, there is significant commercial potential to sell the compost and produce revenue for the project. This will make it self-sustaining as well as improve the overall welfare of the community. [caption id="attachment_8763" align="aligncenter" width="608"] Our composting facility[/caption]   The current pilot project is scalable and consists of 40 toilets across three slum areas in Pondicherry. Research surveys identify around 2,000 people across three slum areas (400 families) that will be able to use the facilities, equating to 50 people (or 10 families) per toilet.   [caption id="attachment_8765" align="aligncenter" width="608"] We have designed a lightweight ecosan toilet for slum areas[/caption]   The provision of sanitation has historically always been a huge cost for governments, NGOs and private individuals. We ...

Too ill to work or learn

May 14, 2014  |   General news,India,Sanitation   |

Too ill to work or learn

As part of our urban ecosan project currently in progress in Pondicherry (a bustling city on the south-east coast of India), we conducted a major health and wellbeing survey in each of the three slums in which we are going to be working. Our research in one of the slums uncovered two startling facts:   1  96% of working people have lost a minimum of ten working days in the past six months due to diarrhoea 2  44% of children have missed school in the past six months also due to diarrhoea Imagine a normal school class here in the UK. That's about 25 children. Now imagine 16 of the children too ill to come in and learn - nearly half the class! It's clear to see the terrible impact this will have on so many children's education. If 44% of children are absent from a class of 25... (grey = absent) That's some pretty shocking figures - even more so when you realise that something as simple as a toilet will keep people healthy. Almost half the people living in Pondicherry do not have ...

A whole village transformed in rural India

A whole village transformed in rural India

More than 200 people helped with sanitation, clean water and housing in rural India thanks to the staff at Allsop In the summer of 2011, we were introduced to a rural village in south-east India called Sengal Odai. The 39 families (more than 200 people) of this community were living in some of the poorest conditions we had ever come across. One of the worst things we witnessed was the water they had to drink, which resembled a thin mud. Many people we spoke to in the village complained of persistent stomach upsets from drinking the infected water, and this ill health was compounded by the fact that the village contained no toilets whatsoever. The houses people lived in were mostly tiny mud huts with thatched roofs that leaked during the rainy season, there was little work in the area and the nearest school was five kilometres away. Whilst the villagers needed toilets and clean water to drink, they also needed a means of earning a living and, if possible, new homes. Throughout 2012, the staff at Allsop set about raising funds to help the people of Sengal Odai. From skydiving to cycling ...

Bath Half raises over £1,000

Bath Half raises over £1,000

A dedicated team of ten ran the Bath Half marathon with us on the 2 March, raising £1,048 for sanitation in India. The money raised will enable us to build four more urgently-needed ecosan (composting) toilets for families in the village of Nathamedu in southern India, where the vast majority of people do not have any sanitation facilities and open defecation is commonplace. We would like to say a huge thank you to Rocco Richards, Sarah and Nathan Dittum, Paul and David Osben, Alex Morris, James Teale, Olumese Okoeguale, Vanden Bowen and Louise Kirby-Garton. Thanks to their efforts, four more families will have safe, clean and private toilets. [caption id="attachment_8313" align="aligncenter" width="318"] Thanks to the Bath Half runners, we are able to build four more family ecosan like this one[/caption]

Hosting our first conference in India

September 24, 2013  |   Events,General news,India,Uncategorized   |

Hosting our first conference in India

In August, Wherever the Need India organised a conference in Pondicherry. The conference centred on The Sunley Foundation funded research project that we have been undertaking for the past two years. The research project, a collaboration with Annamalai University, one of the largest Universities in SE Aasia, is a three year programme monitoring the agricultural benefits of ‘human’ compost and fertiliser – something of which our ecosan toilets give us plenty! Initially the conference was planned for an expected 150 attendees, but after invitations were dispatched over 450 senior scientists from across India applied to attend, and over 260 research papers submitted. The final decision on numbers maintained the 150 attendees, and these were based on the quality of the papers they wanted to present. The event was opened by Smt Sheela Shanta Nair, one of India’s leading civil servants who is now Deputy Chairman of the Tamil Nadu Planning Commission. WTN UK’s scientific representative was Professor Stephen Northcliff of Reading University. The three day meeting was closed by Dr Ramamourti, the Pondicherry Government’s Minister of Agriculture.

Stories from the field – living with poverty

June 04, 2013  |   General news,India,Stories from the field   |

Stories from the field – living with poverty

In another instalment of 'Stories from the field', Jane Bond looks a bit closer at what it means to live in poverty in India... Poverty is everywhere in India. We know this intellectually but the emotional reality is somewhat different. It is impossible to walk down a street in any town or city without witnessing people who are scraping a living one way or another. People live wherever they can, on pavements, in the middle of traffic circles and under overpasses. Poverty is not socially distinct as in the west, it exists cheek by jowel with wealth. My street here in Pondicherry is like the one I lived on in Calcutta. There are some nicer houses and there are some people who live in 1 room or a shack and cook on the street. Everyone knows everyone and much of daily life is conducted out in the open to get the benefit of fresh air. Child care is shared amongst an extended family and everyone knows everything. [caption id="attachment_7501" align="alignleft" width="296"] Millions of people in India live on the streets and in slums[/caption] [caption id="attachment_7502" align="alignright" width="225"]

Stories from the field – Marudor school

May 15, 2013  |   General news,India,Stories from the field   |

Stories from the field – Marudor school

Wherever the Need's Arumugaum and I stop at Marudor Middle School so I can see our newly installed toilet block there. We walk into the schoolyard - sandy earth with basic buildings around it. The windows have shutters and bars but no glass – shutters keep the heat out in the hot months and bars are for security or stopping children from escaping, I’m not sure which! Primary schools have alphabet window bars which I like. It’s quiet apart from repetitive chanting drifting through the air as children learn by rote – India’s key teaching method. A very smiley friendly lady in a purple sari and barefoot comes out of one of the classrooms. This is the headmistress - Thenmoshi. She takes me to her classroom to meet her students who are sitting on the floor reading English from the blackboard at the front. The sight of me means a break from lessons and they crowd around me. They are reluctant to say much and need a bit of prodding from Thenmoshi to speak English but they smile when I take their picture. They chant good morning to me and I ask them how they are; we practice English and they are ...

Spotlight on our work – Kumudimoolai, India

April 09, 2013  |   General news,India,Sanitation,Water   |

Spotlight on our work – Kumudimoolai, India

450 more people now with ecosan, thanks to support from the ACT Foundation Thanks to support from the ACT Foundation, the people of Kumudimmolai now have 90 more ecosan, clean water and livelihoods. Tamil Nadu in the south of India is considered to be one of the wealthiest states in the country, but behind the statistics of economic growth and development lies another story – one of acute poverty. The rural population of Tamil Nadu ranks among the poorest in the world, with an estimated 12 million people living on or below the poverty line. Kumudimoolai is a rural village in Tamil Nadu, 30 miles south of the bustling city of Cuddalore. The 1,973 people living here belong to one the poorest and most excluded social groups in India, and when we first visited the community, poverty was rife. There were no working toilets in the village, which meant people were forced to find somewhere to go out in the open, which was spreading illness and disease. On top of this, the area is prone to flooding, and is always water logged. Human waste and in-organic fertilisers had contaminated the ground and water supply, making it hazardous to drink. Maintaining work was also ...

Stories from the field – a daily reality

Stories from the field – a daily reality

On a visit to a rural Indian village, Jane Bond contemplates the daily reality of living without a toilet I spend a day with one of our field staff, Arumugam to help me better understand our project work and life in rural Tamil Nadu. He takes me to some villages we are planning on working in as soon as we have funds. I know the facts - 7 million+ rural households here in Tamil Nadu don’t have access to toilets – 76% of the rural population. Water quality is worsening, largely due to human fecal waste in drinking water; 91% of water tested in one study was contaminated. Over the last five years incidences of acute diarrheal diseases have increased from about 116,000/year to 523,000/year. Today I’m going to be meeting just a few of the people who live with these conditions on a daily basis.   We go to a village called Boothampedi; the road doesn’t reach the village so we walk along a small dyke; on either side goats and young cows are gazing in recently harvested paddy fields. It’s very hot and it's quiet in the midday heat. The houses are small ...

Stories from the field – organic compost

March 27, 2013  |   General news,India,Stories from the field   |

Stories from the field – organic compost

In her third story, Jane Bond finds out more about our organic compost One of the fundamental benefits of Wherever the Needs approach to Sanitation and water is our compost toilets which mean that human waste is safely and effectively recycled. Human waste is very hazardous to health and can easily enter the water system if not properly managed. Here in India only 30% of the country has a sewage system and much of that is leaking or incomplete, common opinion being that around 20% of the system is approaching effective; mostly waste is dumped into water systems or into pits which often leak, leaching waste through the soil. Each person’s faecal waste is about 127kg/per year; every gram contains: 10 million pathogens, 1 million protozoa, 100,000 helminths (intestinal worms) and 10,000 worms and viruses. It makes my stomach turn and I feel pretty nauseous when I think of India’s 1.2 billion people and the incredibly huge amount of human waste they generate annually, most of it slowly creeping into the water system. So, David (Wherever the Need CEO) and Paramasivan (head of our Indian office) take me to ...

Stories from the field – Rice

March 20, 2013  |   General news,India,Stories from the field   |

Stories from the field – Rice

In the second of her stories from the field, Jane Bond gets to know India and discovers the world of rice... I’m adjusting to rural India and as we travel out to look at projects I am fascinated. Main roads are filled with cows, buses, motorbikes, bicycles and pedestrians sharing the same space – pavements don’t exist and traffic lights are often ignored. The river of humanity is chaotic and noisy, everyone honks musical horns, fails to use indicators and drives where they like. Only cows placidly move along, serene in the knowledge they are the rulers of the road! Roads become smaller, emptier and windier deeper into the rural areas. Its harvest time, paddy fields are being hand scythed by groups of people, haystacks are common, we slow down for herds of bullocks and goats walking along the roads and grain are being spread across the road. This is for threshing rice; as vehicles drive over the rice the outer husk is separated from the grain. I think this is an ingenious labour saving solution. We stop to see the rice grown on Wherever the Need's research ...

Stories from the field – living with dirty water

Stories from the field – living with dirty water

Jane Bond is volunteer Project Officer for Wherever the Need India. She has been living and volunteering in India since November 2011, based in Tamil Nadu since February 2013. Read her stories from the field...   Yesterday it rained heavily and unexpectedly in Tamil Nadu. For some areas it was the first rain in over a year, so I’m going to talk about the realities of living with India’s water supply. You’d think the rain would be a good thing, but it came at the wrong time and many farmers had seedlings damaged. Water here is a health risk we are lucky enough not to be familiar with in the west. When I first came to live in India water became a mild obsession as I adjusted – every drop I needed had to be pumped and was available only at certain times. For cooking and drinking my water had to be filtered and sometimes boiled - all of this took a lot of planning and time. At the time I lived in Calcutta which has terrible sanitation and water issues. Despite my care I was sick with water related illness regularly – sometimes as often as once a month. I ...

Bath Half Marathon 2013

March 04, 2013  |   Events,General news,India,Sanitation   |

Bath Half Marathon 2013

Almost 40 runners completed the Bath Half Marathon for Wherever the Need on Sunday 3rd March. This was a brilliant turnout considering that this year was the first year that we have officially participated in the Bath Half Marathon. Whilst the weather was slightly chilly, our team weren’t disheartened, and dove enthusiastically into the challenge. Together, the team has raised over £5,000 to provide Krishnapuram High School with much-needed sanitation. This is an incredible achievement for a small group of people who have had to train through ice and snow. Their commitment can be seen in their individual stories. The Hart Family raised over £1,000 to help Wherever the Need provide sanitation to those who need it most. Not only did the Hart Family do a fantastic job of raising funds, they encouraged friends to run the Bath Half too. Each member of the family finished in an impressive time, securing an extra £400 in sponsorship. Despite being hampered by a foot injury, Will finished the race just 5 minutes later than Nick and Chris. Emma Davey and Laura James documented their Bath Half journeys by blogging about their experience running for Wherever ...

How two determined school girls in India are helping us bring eco-toilets to their community

January 23, 2013  |   General news,India,Sanitation   |

How two determined school girls in India are helping us bring eco-toilets to their community

Anaivari is a small rural village in Tamil Nadu, India, and its story is very familiar to us. Home to 171 families the community is extremely poor – there is no sanitation, which means that the local environment and water sources are polluted, spreading illness and disease. [caption id="attachment_6863" align="alignright" width="280"] Without sanitation, water and the environment becomes polluted[/caption] Two teenage girls from Anaivari attend the nearby girls’ secondary school in the town of Chandra – a school where we worked to build eco-sanitation facilities for its 1200 pupils. Before the toilets were built girls attending the school had no option but to use nearby wasteland, which was a breeding ground for disease and where they risked being attacked. A lack of safe, private sanitation facilities meant that pupils were often kept away from school (especially once they reached adolescence) missing out on vital education. The new school facilities have been in use for almost a year now and in that short time there has been a reduction in sanitation-related sickness such as diarrhoea and, because parents know their children can go to the toilet in privacy and safety, there has been a reduction in ...

Introducing an innovative sanitation project

October 15, 2012  |   General news,India   |

Introducing an innovative sanitation project

Tamil Nadu, on the south east coast of India, is considered to be one of the wealthiest states in the country, but behind the economic and industrial growth lies another story – one of acute poverty. We have started to work with six of the poorest villages in rural Tamil Nadu. Not a single family in these communities have access to a toilet, which means that the local environment and water sources are polluted, spreading illness and disease - diarrhoea remains one of the biggest killers of children in the region. So what are we doing? We are putting Sanitation First, and working to make sure every person in all six villages has access to good sanitation facilities. We are building ecosan (composting) toilets for each and every family within the villages. Why is this innovative? What's new and exciting is that we are providing a sanitation service to maintain the programme. We are employing a care-taking team to empty the toilets and make sure the facilities are well-maintained and clean. How do we pay for this? This is the great bit - there ...

Sanitation facilities improving school attendance in rural India

Sanitation facilities improving school attendance in rural India

At Wherever the Need we have always made it clear that sanitation should come first, because the only sustainable way to address issues of poverty is to tackle them at the point at which they originate. Whilst education is of critical importance to improving lives and alleviating poverty, effective learning can only take place when students are well enough to attend school and concentrate in lessons. But it is now widely accepted that illness created by inadequate sanitation damages school attendance and education levels. A month ago, we conducted a survey of attendance at girls’ schools in rural India, following the introduction of our new eco-sanitation facilities. The increased attendance figures proved that providing schools with sanitation facilities results in better health and better attendance. On average, there has been an increase of almost 15% in girls’ school attendance since sanitation facilities were available. [caption id="attachment_6209" align="alignright" width="608" caption="Attendance at Vadalur Girls' School has increased by 7% since Wherever the Need installed eco-sanitation facilities."][/caption] A notable example is the Orathur School, in Tamil Nadu. Since we installed new toilets in 2010, we have seen an incredible 30% increase in attendance. This ...

Sohail Rahman Reports on India’s Sanitation Problems

July 19, 2012  |   General news,India,Poverty,Sanitation   |

Sohail Rahman Reports on India’s Sanitation Problems

Reporting for Al Jazeera, Sohail Rahman covers the sanitation problems facing India, which become increasingly pressing as population growth and urbanisation continue apace.  Broadcasting from New Delhi he exposes the shocking statistics, including the fact that over 50% of Indians do not have access to a clean, constructed toilet and how 60% of all defecation in the world occurs in India.  It is also demonstrated how this is not just an individual issue, as the World Bank reported last year that poor sanitation cost the country $54 billion as a result of the related health issues, decreased productivity and reduced tourists.  You can now watch the short clip below: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RI_Q0ejCd7Y

WTN ecosan featured in Nature journal

June 19, 2012  |   Environment,General news,India,Sanitation   |

WTN ecosan featured in Nature journal

This is an exciting week for us, as our work has been published in Nature - the global journal of science. The article, credited to Shunmuga Paramasivan from our Indian office, is a good introduction to our work and how we use education/schools as a method to teach good hygiene practices through our ecological sanitation systems. Read the article in full here

Charity Winter Ball Update

May 21, 2012  |   Events,General news,India   |

Charity Winter Ball Update

Winter Ball raises £85,000 for project in India In December 2011, over 460 people gathered for the Just Need Ball at The Dorchester Hotel in London, to support the work we are doing in India. Organised by an experienced committee made up of well known figures in the commercial property field, the evening, at which Michael Portillo was the guest speaker, was a great success and raised a total of £85,000 to spend on projects. The money raised will be going to create much needed infrastructure in several slums on the periphery of Pondicherry in the State of Tamil Nadu, in the south-east of India. Our major focus is the provision of sanitation and clean water as the foundation to helping people work their own way out of poverty; after all, who is able to work hard to improve their lives (be it in education or employment) if they are constantly ill? This particular area was chosen as it is an extension to an earlier successful project run in the same district. Not only will more than 1,300 people have access to sustainable sanitation and 2,500 people be provided with ...

Emergency Cyclone Appeal

January 05, 2012  |   General news,India,Sanitation,Water   |

Emergency Cyclone Appeal

India Cyclone - Emergency Appeal You may have heard on the news about the cyclone that recently devastated south-east India. Tamil Nadu, the region in which many of Wherever the Need's projects are based, has been badly hit - the cyclone has devastated the lives of the people and communities with whom we work so closely. Infrastructure, services and facilities are severely impaired and damaged; towns and villages are without electricity and clean water; many people have been left homeless. Water supplies are polluted and there is a genuine concern that there will be an outbreak of diseases such as diarrhoea or cholera We want to use our expertise and knowledge of the region to get sanitation and water facilities to where they are most needed and we need your help. Please donate now. Please donate... Yes No Are you a UK taxpayer and can we claim gift aid? Would you like to receive our occasional newsletter?

A message from India

December 19, 2011  |   General news,India,Sanitation,Water   |

A message from India

Following a recent visit to some of our projects in India, Hardeep Sandher writes of her experiences during her time there. Read the full Property Week article here (PDF 2.1mb) <strong>or click to enlarge:</strong>

2011 Summer Newsletter

September 05, 2011  |   General news,India,Livelihoods,Newsletters,Sanitation,Water   |

2011 Summer Newsletter

Read our Summer Newsletter for a run-down on our recent work in India. Click the newsletter to enlarge Read the full newsletter here (PDF 1.4mb)

Urine fertilising crops and saving money in India

July 14, 2011  |   Environment,General news,India,Sanitation   |

Urine fertilising crops and saving money in India

"Consider these facts about urine: Adults produce about four to eight cups (one to two liters) per day, it's a reservoir of nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus, the same elements that nourish crops; and it's cheap to make. That's the kind of information that Sridevi Govindaraj, an Indian agriculture expert, had in mind when she proposed that dousing fields with urine could improve sanitation and boost farmers' incomes. “Human urine is indeed not an unwanted waste, but it is a useful resource,” Sridevi wrote to E4C. Urine, it turns out, is a huge and mostly untapped reserve of crop fertilizer. If Indians collected and applied 40 percent of their urine, the country could save $26.7 million (1.2 billion rupees) in fertilizer costs, Sridevi calculates. A unique field Those figures are from her doctoral thesis at the University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore in 2009, with research funded by the Arghym foundation. Sridevi may be the only person in India with a doctorate in ecological sanitation. The urine proposal She proposes using urine in conjunction with regular fertilizers. People would collect it in specially rigged toilets, like EcoSan latrines. Or, in lieu of a commercial product, DIY attachments to toilets in the men's room ...

Ecosan toilets for 2,000 people in India

June 21, 2011  |   General news,India,Projects,Sanitation   |

Ecosan toilets for 2,000 people in India

In November 2010, we held a large fundraising event which raised £40,000, enabling us to build individual ecosan (composting) toilets for 2,000 people in the village of Kanur, Tamil Nadu, India. The Doorway to Dignity charity auction was a great success, auctioning off unique pieces of artwork from artists, musicians, celebrities, fashion designers and politicians; we had contributions from Annie Lennox, Kenneth Branagh, Ralph Steadman, Maggie Hambling and world-renowned shoe designer Manolo Blahnik, to name but a few. Visit the project page and see more pictures

Cleaning Delhi through Facebook

April 18, 2011  |   Empowerment,Environment,General news,India,Sanitation   |

Cleaning Delhi through Facebook

"When 22-year-old Piyush Goyal posted his complaint of garbage spilling over from the dump in his area, on the Facebook page of Municipal Corporation of Delhi (MCD), little had he expected the civic agency to take action within 24 hours. But it did, pleasantly surprising Goyal. MCD launched its Facebook page earlier this month to ensure effective monitoring of garbage lifting at areas under its jurisdiction. The civic agency has started off on the surest of footing, Goyal feels. “When I heard about this initiative, I thought I should also post pictures of unclean dhalao (standalone garbage warehouse) in my area. I was expecting the action but never thought it will be so quick,” he says. On January 8, he clicked pictures of the seven dirty ones in South Delhi’s R K Puram area and posted them on Facebook. And the next day, he says, he saw the pictures of clean dhalaos uploaded by the MCD. “There is lot of transparency through this way. The man who actually cleans it asked me why I uploaded the pictures. So the information is going from top to the bottom,” says Goyal. It’s a not even a month, and the civic agency has already received close to ...

1,500 teenage girls now with sanitation

March 17, 2011  |   General news,India,Sanitation   |

1,500 teenage girls now with sanitation

Our recently completed sanitation project in Vadalore Girls Secondary School has provided 1,500 teenage girls with much needed sanitation facilities. The girls will benefit hugely from increased privacy the units provide and hygiene training, improving their health and ensuring they can stay in school even during menstruation. This will enable them to gain a full education and increase their future employment prospects. See the project photos here

Battle over Mumbai’s slums

March 11, 2011  |   General news,India   |

Battle over Mumbai’s slums

"Developers hope to raze the slums and make vast profits from commercial projects, but slum residents have other ideas. Ganesh Krupa Society is part of Golibar, Mumbai's second largest slum, spanning 140 acres. The site is at the centre of a fierce battle between its residents and a developer that wants to raze the area to make way for a commercial project. Already concrete homes across this narrow maze of more than 300 dwellings have been demolished. In January, violence erupted when the developer tried to evict 45 families following a high court order. None of the families moved, claiming their signatures consenting to the project had been forged. Devasandhan Nair, 47, a resident, says: "The basis of redevelopment is consent but our consent was forged. Even a dead woman's signature was forged. How can the court instruct the builder to evict us when a forgery case has been lodged by us with the police?" Conflicts between developers and slum dwellers have been unfolding across the city for more than a decade, stalling slum redevelopment projects designed to pull 60% of Mumbai's population out of harsh living conditions. Under a controversial slum rehabilitation policy, developers can snap up land for commercial development in exchange ...

Indian brides inspire a toilet revolution

February 28, 2011  |   Empowerment,General news,India,Sanitation   |

Indian brides inspire a toilet revolution

"Young women are part of a campaign to bring much-needed social change and improve sanitation facilities If you don't have a toilet at home, you might not get a bride in India. In a silent revolution of sorts, Indian women across the country, especially in rural and semi-urban areas, have a single condition before they agree to a match – the groom must have a toilet in his home. The "No Toilet, No Bride" campaign, initiated by the government, is co-opting young women to bring in much-needed social change. Across the country, more people have access to mobile phones than to toilets..." Read the full article here: http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/poverty-matters/2011/feb/28/indian-brides-toilet-revolution

Lack of sanitation draining GDP in India

February 07, 2011  |   General news,India,Sanitation   |

Lack of sanitation draining GDP in India

"In 2006, every tenth death in India was caused by diseases linked to inadequate sanitation. Of these deaths, numbering 7,68,000 approximately, around 3,95,000 were children who died of diarrhoea. The figures, thrown up by World Bank, stand in direct contrast with the 9% economic growth the country celebrates at all given opportunities. The World Bank (WB) report in fact says that not only are precious lives being lost, but the unsanitary living conditions are causing huge losses to the country's economy too. This loss figure for 2006 has been put at Rs 2.4 trillion ($53.8 billion), equivalent to 6.4% of the country's gross domestic product (GDP), in the report, 'Economic Impacts of Inadequate Sanitation', released on Monday. All the findings are based on 2006 figures, but the report does foresee a similar magnitude of losses in later years. “It shows children and poor households bear the brunt of poor sanitation,” Christopher Juan Costain, WB Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) Regional Team Leader for South Asia, told HT. The study devised the figures after evaluating costs associated with death and disease, accessing and treating water, and losses in education, productivity, time, and tourism. While premature mortality and other health-related impacts of inadequate sanitation ...

If it were my home

February 04, 2011  |   General news,India,Kenya,Sierra Leone   |

If it were my home

Oh we do like our interactive media. You can use this website to compare your country to any other in the world. Did you know that you would use 91.42% less electricity if you lived in India? Have a play: http://www.ifitweremyhome.com/

A Christmas success

January 06, 2011  |   General news,India   |

A Christmas success

A huge thank you to everyone who contributed towards our Christmas Appeal, which aimed to raise £7,300 to feed 200 street children in Bangalore for a year. Thanks to your generosity we have raised over £10,000 for this cause! The extra £2,700 raised beyond our target will be used to provide school equipment and books for the children, which will greatly enhance their education and future prospects. We are currently discussing with an organisation in India the possibility of them matching all the money we have raised; this would improve the childrens' lives more than we had hoped for. Watch this space for updates in the coming months... To find out more about our Christmas Appeal, visit this page: www.wherevertheneed.org.uk/donate/christmas-appeal-2010

For £20 you can give a child Christmas dinner for a year

December 13, 2010  |   General news,India   |

For £20 you can give a child Christmas dinner for a year

Christmas. It is that time of year when we ask you to think of others less fortunate than ourselves. Here at Wherever the Need we are very focussed on our core work of sanitation, water and livelihoods. These are the foundations from which we can help people help themselves out of poverty. At Christmas, however, we try and do something a little different and for the past few years we have been seeking donations for a range of items that we felt could positively affect the lives of the people among whom we are working. This Christmas we thought we would change the idea slightly. We are trying to raise at least £7,600 to provide 200 street children in Bangalore with a nutritious meal every day for a year. To find out more about our Christmas Appeal and to donate, follow this link: http://wherevertheneed.org.uk/donate/christmas-appeal-2010

India, Bihar: ‘Dirty, horrible job’ of manual scavengers

India, Bihar: ‘Dirty, horrible job’ of manual scavengers

A manual scavenger carries a tin of human waste from a dry latrine. Photo: BBC “The worst thing is that the baskets we carry the waste in, often leak and drips down over your clothes”, manual scavenger Lakshmi Devi from rural Bihar tells BBC correspondent Mike Thomson. All her seven children are boys who clean out sewage tanks for their work. Manual removal of excreta (night soil) from “dry toilets” is the job of ‘dalit’ (low caste) women in India. “If I had a daughter I would rather that we all die of hunger than allow her to do the work we do”, Lakshmi said. Listen to Laksmi Devi’s interview (10 Nov 2010), which was broadcast on BBC Radio 4, and read a background article (17 Nov 2010) by Mike Thomson on scavengers from the serie on “India’s forgotten people”.

India: “We need a sanitation revolution”

November 28, 2010  |   Environment,General news,India,Poverty,Sanitation   |

India: “We need a sanitation revolution”

India: ‘We need a sanitation revolution here’, says adviser to Urban Affairs minister Speaking at a workshop on the ‘City Sanitation Plan’ in Bangalore, the Adviser to Karnataka state Chief Minister on Urban Affairs A. Ravindra said: “We need a sanitation revolution in the country. There is a need to create public awareness and use innovative and low-cost technologies for better sanitation”. Adding to this, at the inauguration if the workshop, the Karnataka state Minister for Urban Development S. Suresh Kumar stated: “It is unfortunate that we have not made sanitation our priority. This is evident as according to a recent report, there are more mobile users than toilet users in the country. Sanitation does not only mean using toilets; it also includes efficient solid waste management, underground drainage network, and keeping our cities and towns clean”. Karnataka is looking to rank first in the second round of the National City Rating under the National Urban Sanitation Policy to be announced on 8 December 2010. In the first round in May 2010, Mysore secured the second place, while the eighth, 12th, 15th and 22nd positions went to Bangalore, Mangalore, Mandya and Bidar respectively. “We must strive to secure the first position next year. We must work ...

Reading between poverty lines

September 07, 2010  |   General news,India,Poverty   |

Reading between poverty lines

Are poverty levels in rural India higher than has been previously thought? Find out more here: http://www.downtoearth.org.in/node/361