Archive for the ‘Livelihoods’ Category

Changing lives in a Sierra Leone community

Changing lives in a Sierra Leone community

Shenge village is a remote community in Barri Chiefdom, southeastern Sierra Leone, home to approximately 300 people. The village is very remote, two kilometres from the nearest dirt road. Much of the surrounding rainforest has been cleared for farming or rubber plantations, but there are still areas like Shenge that are vital forest wildlife habitats. When we first visited Shenge we found a very poor community who had no ...

A whole village transformed in rural India

A whole village transformed in rural India

More than 200 people helped with sanitation, clean water and housing in rural India thanks to the staff at Allsop In the summer of 2011, we were introduced to a rural village in south-east India called Sengal Odai. The 39 families (more than 200 people) of this community were living in some of the poorest conditions we had ever come across. One of the worst things we witnessed was ...

Sanitation facilities improving school attendance in rural India

Sanitation facilities improving school attendance in rural India

At Wherever the Need we have always made it clear that sanitation should come first, because the only sustainable way to address issues of poverty is to tackle them at the point at which they originate. Whilst education is of critical importance to improving lives and alleviating poverty, effective learning can only take place when students are well enough to attend school and concentrate in lessons. But it ...

2011 Summer Newsletter

September 05, 2011  |   General news,India,Livelihoods,Newsletters,Sanitation,Water   |

2011 Summer Newsletter

Read our Summer Newsletter for a run-down on our recent work in India. Click the newsletter to enlarge Read the full newsletter here (PDF 1.4mb)

Fiona Bruce narrates our new film

Fiona Bruce narrates our new film

Well known BBC newsreader and presenter Fiona Bruce is the voice-over for our latest film, "Independence, not Dependence". The video gives an introduction to who we are, what we do and why we do it. We believe in creating the conditions to allow people to become empowered and independent in their way out of poverty, not becoming dependent upon foreign aid. Find out more by watching the ...

One success leads to another in Sierra Leone

One success leads to another in Sierra Leone

Providing sanitation, water and livelihoods to 11,000 people in Sierra Leone. The success of our work in Gbongay has secured us funding for a further 19 villages in the Pejeh Chiefdom, allowing us to help forever change the lives of thousands... In the early part of 2006, we were approached by the village community of ...

Kenya project photos

October 25, 2010  |   Environment,General news,Kenya,Livelihoods,Sanitation,Water   |

Kenya project photos

The first photos for our project in Narok South, Kenya are ready for all to see. This is an exciting project 140 kilometres west of Nairobi in which we are helping the community with ecosan toilets, a large rainwater reservoir, a small livelihood opportunity and a tree nursery. These facilities will work in tandem with the pastoralist nature of the local population. See the photos and project details here: ...

Ecosan vs pit toilets & MDGs

July 18, 2010  |   Environment,General news,Livelihoods,Sanitation   |

Ecosan vs pit toilets & MDGs

I work on the premise that any individual or organisation that is involved with sanitation is ‘dedicated to the cause’, because we all know how important it is in the fight against illness, premature death and poverty.  The points I make below are not meant to be an attack on others in this sector, but simply an opinion based on whether our piecemeal approach is the most ...

Six reasons we use ecosan

Six reasons we use ecosan

There is a reason we chose to use ecosan in all our projects. In fact there are six reasons, and we would like to share these with you... A long-term sustainable ecosan system will: ensure water sources are not polluted by open defecation (even if pollution could occur through flooding); provide long-term facilities to eradicate generation-old open defecation practices; lead to ...