Archive for the ‘Projects’ Category

Sanitation initiative for Indian slums

July 21, 2014  |   General news,India,Projects,Sanitation   |

Sanitation initiative for Indian slums

We have developed a brilliantly simple solution to help mitigate the horrendous problems caused by a lack of sanitation in India’s slum areas. Using our unique waste management system, the content from the toilets is routinely collected by our own operatives and taken back to our central processing plant where it’s quickly composted down for agricultural use. The primary purpose of the project is, of course, to reduce disease and poverty but in addition, there is significant commercial potential to sell the compost and produce revenue for the project. This will make it self-sustaining as well as improve the overall welfare of the community. [caption id="attachment_8763" align="aligncenter" width="608"] Our composting facility[/caption]   The current pilot project is scalable and consists of 40 toilets across three slum areas in Pondicherry. Research surveys identify around 2,000 people across three slum areas (400 families) that will be able to use the facilities, equating to 50 people (or 10 families) per toilet.   [caption id="attachment_8765" align="aligncenter" width="608"] We have designed a lightweight ecosan toilet for slum areas[/caption]   The provision of sanitation has historically always been a huge cost for governments, NGOs and private individuals. We ...

Changing lives in a Sierra Leone community

Changing lives in a Sierra Leone community

Shenge village is a remote community in Barri Chiefdom, southeastern Sierra Leone, home to approximately 300 people. The village is very remote, two kilometres from the nearest dirt road. Much of the surrounding rainforest has been cleared for farming or rubber plantations, but there are still areas like Shenge that are vital forest wildlife habitats. When we first visited Shenge we found a very poor community who had no sanitation or clean water, meaning intestinal illness was very common, and particularly serious for the children. The villagers were reliant on subsistence farming, and children had to walk about 4 miles each way through the forest to the nearest school at Potoru, so younger children missed out on education altogether. [caption id="attachment_8723" align="aligncenter" width="475"] With no well, people had to collect dirty water from streams[/caption] Thanks to the generous support of a proactive community group we began working with the village in 2011, and Shenge now has a community ecosan toilet, a well, and cassava & groundnut farming livelihood support. More recently, thanks to a further generous donation from a regular supporter, we have also built a two-classroom primary school. The school will open its doors ...

Building children a future in Sierra Leone

January 27, 2014  |   Education,General news,Projects,Sierra Leone   |

Building children a future in Sierra Leone

Falcons School fundraises for primary education in Sierra Leone Last year, pupils, parents and staff from Falcons Boys Preparatory School in Richmond joined forces, raising over £10,000 towards education in Sierra Leone. Thanks to their phenomenal efforts, we have been able to build a primary school in Nyeyama village, bringing a good education to the children there for generations to come. Nyeyama is an impoverished and isolated village, home to 600 people in the Barri Chiefdom of Sierra Leone. Although education is a legal requirement for children in Sierra Leone, the country's 11-year civil war resulted in the destruction of 1,270 primary schools, making access to education in remote villages like Nyeyama a real struggle. Some children were having to walk 10 miles every day to reach the nearest school, while younger children who could not manage this walk were having to make do with under-resourced classes held in a run-down shack. [caption id="attachment_8215" align="alignleft" width="257"] Nyeyama's old school building[/caption][caption id="attachment_8214" align="alignright" width="237"] Teaching in the old building was a struggle[/caption] In late 2013 we finished building a new, fully-equipped primary school ...

Sanitation facilities improving school attendance in rural India

Sanitation facilities improving school attendance in rural India

At Wherever the Need we have always made it clear that sanitation should come first, because the only sustainable way to address issues of poverty is to tackle them at the point at which they originate. Whilst education is of critical importance to improving lives and alleviating poverty, effective learning can only take place when students are well enough to attend school and concentrate in lessons. But it is now widely accepted that illness created by inadequate sanitation damages school attendance and education levels. A month ago, we conducted a survey of attendance at girls’ schools in rural India, following the introduction of our new eco-sanitation facilities. The increased attendance figures proved that providing schools with sanitation facilities results in better health and better attendance. On average, there has been an increase of almost 15% in girls’ school attendance since sanitation facilities were available. [caption id="attachment_6209" align="alignright" width="608" caption="Attendance at Vadalur Girls' School has increased by 7% since Wherever the Need installed eco-sanitation facilities."][/caption] A notable example is the Orathur School, in Tamil Nadu. Since we installed new toilets in 2010, we have seen an incredible 30% increase in attendance. This ...

Ripples London to Paris Bike Ride

July 05, 2012  |   Events,General news,Projects,Uncategorized   |

Ripples London to Paris Bike Ride

You may well have heard about our partnership with Ripples Bathrooms, who are helping to raise funds for our project in the village of Arasur in Tamil Nadu, India. Well the fundraising recently reached new gruelling highs with Paul Crow, Managing Director of Ripples Ltd, cycling unsupported from London to Paris.  The 200 miles trip, via Newhaven, Dieppe and Giesors, took him three days, during which he burnt around 15,000 calories and ground through 70,000 pedal strokes. His trip was recently featured in both the West Wilts and the South Wilts Magazines, a copy of which you can find below.  If you would like to support Paul you can donate below. You can donate online using paypal below. Thank you! Please donate... Yes No Are you a UK taxpayer and can we claim gift aid? Would you like to receive our occasional newsletter?

Ecosan toilets for 2,000 people in India

June 21, 2011  |   General news,India,Projects,Sanitation   |

Ecosan toilets for 2,000 people in India

In November 2010, we held a large fundraising event which raised £40,000, enabling us to build individual ecosan (composting) toilets for 2,000 people in the village of Kanur, Tamil Nadu, India. The Doorway to Dignity charity auction was a great success, auctioning off unique pieces of artwork from artists, musicians, celebrities, fashion designers and politicians; we had contributions from Annie Lennox, Kenneth Branagh, Ralph Steadman, Maggie Hambling and world-renowned shoe designer Manolo Blahnik, to name but a few. Visit the project page and see more pictures

One success leads to another in Sierra Leone

One success leads to another in Sierra Leone

Providing sanitation, water and livelihoods to 11,000 people in Sierra Leone. The success of our work in Gbongay has secured us funding for a further 19 villages in the Pejeh Chiefdom, allowing us to help forever change the lives of thousands... In the early part of 2006, we were approached by the village community of Gbongay in south-eastern Sierra Leone asking for help in the provision of water and livelihoods. When we assessed the village we discovered an area ravaged by the eleven year civil war (which ended in 2002), exploited by outsiders and politicians alike, and with a minimal level of infrastructure. From an initial survey and village meetings, we discovered that in a community of 750 people, on average one child under the age of five died every six weeks because of non-existent sanitation and polluted water. Since we introduced new ecosan and wells in Gbongay, not one child has died from intestinal illness. From this success, we have been able to secure funding to expand the project throughout Pejeh Chiefdom. By the time the works are completed ...